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ANCIENT COIN CLUB OF
LOS ANGELES

MEETING NOTICES 2007

MONTHLY MEETINGS ARE NOW HELD AT THE SHERMAN OAKS GALLERIA.

JANUARY 2007

Happy New Year!

The next meeting will be held on Sunday January 14, 2007. The venue will be the Balboa Mission Town Hall, Granada Hills. We will have our Annual Installation of Officers followed by the usual festive banquet. In addition, we will be treated to a coin history game hosted by Roger Burry entitled Who Was Artabanos?.

LAST MEETING

Mr. Liladhar R. Pendse, Librarian for Slavic/East European Studies, South Asian Studies, UCLA Young Research Library, gave a stimulating presentation on the Images of Power and Glory on the Coinage of Trajan. His article on this topic was featured in the August 2006 Celator. It was by way of being a case study on esthetics and propaganda. The propaganda angle was to depict important moments during the reign. Some printed matter was shown which depicted Julius Caesar, Divus Iulii; Augustus' Dacian Campaign (Dacicus); reliefs from Trajan's Column; the bridge over the Danube (2 levels, the original being a pontoon); Dacia Capta coins; a Trajan denarius (Dacia provincia); other "Capta" examples; and Parthia Capta (gold). The presentation was rather in the nature of a colloquy with acknowledgments of sources by among others Roger Burry.

BUSINESS

Michael Connor, Web-master, reported that we had an upsurge in visitors (150 new visitors per day), twice as many new visitors as this time last year. Ken Baumheckel, OCACC liaison, reported that at last month's meeting Mr. Narcissian spoke and covered his book. This month's topic is All Things Hadrian. Roger Burry, Celator liaison, reported that in the latest celator there is some very good art as a result of Michael Connor's photography. Ken Friedman, Esq. representing the incorporation committee, said that the 501(c)3 application had been approved. There is now in existence a form to give donees. Barry Rightman reported that as a result of having purchased a number of Harold Donald's books, we are up to snuff on door prizes for the nonce.

ELECTION

The following officers were nominated and duly elected to serve for 2007:

President: Bob Effler
Vice-President: Roger Burry
Secretary: David Stepsay
Treasurer: Barry Rightman

The following additional board members were elected by acclamation:

Hugh Kramer (Past President)
Michael Connor
Ken Friedman
Merrill Gibson
Michelle Ramage
Paul Ranc

Apologies for the sloppiness of this effort due to anxiousness to get away to the impending American Philological Assn. conference in San Diego, January 4/7, where I will be humbly serving at the registry desk. Hopefully I will pick up something of use to the club from one of the seminars or the book store, which is always fascinating and a reason all in itself to attend the conference

Respectfully submitted
David Stepsay, Secretary

FEBRUARY 2007

The next meeting of the club will be held on Sunday, February 11, 2007 at the usual time of 1:00 P. The venue will be the Balboa Mission Town Hall, Granada Hills. At the last meeting the following took place:

INSTALLATION

The following officers were duly sworn in to serve for 2007:

President: Bob Effler
Vice-President: Roger Burry
Secretary: David Stepsay
Treasurer: Barry Rightman

The following board members were duly sworn in for 2007:

Hugh Kramer (Past President)
Michael Connor
Ken Friedman
Merrill Gibson
Michelle Ramage
Paul Ranc

BUSINESS

Barry Rightman reported that rent for this room for the next year has been paid. Michael Connor, Webmaster, reported that so far this year we have had 5,280 visitors! Roger Burry reported that club notes had been placed in the Celator. The presenter for next month will be Professor Cleve. Ken Friedman reported a better meeting room may be available in the Sherman Oaks Galleria. It was reported that the next Long Beach show will be February 15-17, 2007.

The banquet ensued after the brief business meeting. This was followed by Who was Artabanos? a quiz game hosted by Roger Burry. A good time was by all!

Respectfully submitted
David Stepsay, Secretary

MARCH 2007

The next meeting of the club will take place on Sunday, March 11, 2007 at the usual time of 1:00 P.M. The venue will be the Balboa Mission Town Hall, Granada Hills. Roger Burry will expound on China: History and Coinage. Members are encouraged to bring their Chinese coins for show and tell.

LAST MEETING

The undersigned was not able to attend the last meeting. I understand that the presentation by Dr. Robert Cleve was extremely worthwhile and the notes of that and the Business transactions will be reported on in the next meeting notice.

Respectfully submitted
David Stepsay, Secretary

APRIL 2007

The next meeting of the club will take place on Sunday, April 8, 2007 at the usual time of 1:00 P.M. The venue will be the Balboa Mission Town Hall, Granada Hills. The presentation for the upcoming meeting will be by Frank Martin on Hadrian: His Life, Times, and Coins.

LAST MEETING - BUSINESS

Michael Connor, Web-Master, reported that articles by Ted Blake on Augustus and Bob Effler on Galba are now posted - bringing us to 9 of the XII Caesars. We have 150/170 new visitors a day. Future projects include adding links to high resolution images of illustrated coins where possible. There was a discussion on the pros and cons of Dealer sponsorship.

Vice President Roger Burry reported that we will have one article in Celator, in about a month. In May, there will be a coin-grading session and/or a quiz. Anyone may send in coins and questions. In June, Randy Butler will expound on Turkey.

There was a brief discussion re: the recent Long Beach convention: the coins were expensive and picked over. Dean Ruby passed out some currency for inspection and Randy Butler is in search of information on the first mortal to be depicted on a coin.

LAST MEETING - PRESENTATION

Roger Burry gave a talk entitled China 2006: Old and New and...a Few Coins Too. It was a narration of his recent trip to that country and was presented in his usual comprehensive and erudite manner. His was the first use of music in connection with a presentation in one of our meetings that I can recall. It was very effective as it was a selection of the ethnic music that you might hear in present day China.

China is the third of the four largest countries in the world. The geography more-or-less dictates the growing of rice in the south and wheat in the north. The population is 1.3 billion, of which about 70% are on 40% of the land. The population is concentrated on the east coast and the south. Official language is Mandarin (92% are of Han derivation), but there are many different dialects. There are big Turkish and Mongol minorities. Roger showed a History Timeline, a graph he made indicating the dynasties from 3000 BCE to the last century CE and a chronological history showing his itinerary. He spent 4 days in Lhasa, Tibet, and went as a member of a tour group. Saw the Great Wall and got some great pictures of same, which was originally 1500 miles long, built of brick and rubble. The Imperial Palace (Forbidden City) is now a museum, which covers 1/4 square mile, more for domestic than foreign delectation. There are more-or-less 9999 rooms in the structure. The Terra Cotta Army was the next item of interest, 5 or 6,000 all in one room (they are life-size). They are painted and were left in situ from their era, 100 BCE. The weapons which they were equipped with were real but deteriorated over the ages. Roger showed a stele, documenting the presence thereabouts of Nestorian Christianity. An array of coins were shown and a diagrammatic graphic arrangement chronologically also. This and Greek coinage are not related. Most coins are holed. The hole was for putting the coins on a string (square or round). The weight varied, but averaged out over a large number being weighed. They were bronze cast until the 20th century. Spade money, key-shaped coins, in alternating styles. Various displays of coin types and types of calligraphy and variants of calligraphy between coins of the same issue.

Respectfully submitted
David Stepsay, Secretary

MAY 2007

The next meeting of the club will take place on Sunday May 13, 2007 at the usual time of 1:00 P.M. The venue will be the Balboa Mission Town Hall, Granada Hills. Roger Burry will host the coin quiz game Who Was Artabanos?, Part II.

LAST MEETING - BUSINESS

At the last meeting Barry Rightman, Treasurer, presented the 2006 financial report and reported that the 990EZ had been submitted. Michael Connor, Webmaster, reported that the Website continued to receive 170-180 visitors per day. The article on Carausius is upcoming. Four emperors are still needed, especially Claudius and Caligula to fulfill the Coins of 12 Caesars project we have been promulgating. The Venue Committee reported on the Sherman Oaks Galleria community room. A motion was made, seconded and passed that the Galleria Community Room be used on an occasional basis and to authorize the officers of the club to sign an indemnification agreement. Roger as Program Chairman said that next month we will play Who was Artabanos? the Coin-Jeopardy-game - again. The following month, Randy Butler will present on Turkey. The President thanked the speaker at the prior month's meeting, Roger Burry. Anent the subject of guest speakers, a discussion re: honoraria was undertaken with the outcome that a motion was made, seconded, and passed as follows: That an honorarium limited to $50 be offered to any guest speaker, not a club member, at the determination of the board on a case-by-case basis. Roger passed out a 2007 ACCLA Program Survey to be filled out by the members to help him determine the nature of future programs.

LAST MEETING - PRESENTATION

Frank Martin was the presenter of Hadrian: His Life, Times, and Coins. He set forth the genesis of his interest with a quote from Michael Grant. Hadrian was born of a provincial Spanish family in 76 CE. Hadrian pursued the cursus honorum (being praetor, governor, consul). He was governor of Syria. In 117 he was proclaimed Augustus (by his troops). Made peace with the Parthians. In 118 the murder of "4 great men" (his opponents) and Hadrian's arrival in Rome, where he was not very popular. 121-125: he conducted travels within the Empire (he felt it should be down-sized). While in Britain he initiated the eponymous Wall, which he never saw. 122-123: He brought Antinous to Rome, and he soon became his favorite. 128-132: Traveled to W. Asia and E. Europe. Died in 138.

TRIVIAL VOCABULARY SOURCE

Where did the term "parting shot" come from? Well, when the Parthians were on the war-path, they would suddenly turn and pretend to run away from the "awesome" enemy -- and then just as suddenly turn around and, facing the enemy, take aim and let fly with all the slings and arrows in their arsenal. This was called a "Parthian shot" and eventually as a parting shot. This from a book called The Road to Ubar by Nicholas Clapp.

Respectfully submitted
David Stepsay, Secretary

JUNE 2007

The next meeting of the Club will be held on Sunday, June 10, 2007 at the usual time of 1:00 P.M. The venue will the Balboa Mission Town Hall, Granada Hills. The presentation for the upcoming meeting will be by Randy Butler, a frequent presenter who will let us in on his Travels in Turkey: Sites and Coins of the Western Coast from Gallipoli to Ephesus.

At the last meeting the following took place:

BUSINESS

Barry Rightman, Treasurer, gave his report. Michael Connor, Webmaster, reported that we had an increase in visitors to 200 per day, in part due to links to images from Harvard University class sites and E-bay dealers. Ken Baumheckel reported on Orange Co. Ancient Coin club: based on an idea by Merrill Gibson they are having an attribution workshop.

PRESENTATION

Who Was Artabanos?, a game that has been entitled tongue-in-cheek, Coin Jeopardy was conducted by its innovator, Roger Burry as Interlocutor and Michael Connor as Answer Man. This one had a new feature, to wit, the lowest-scoring team gets a Hail Mary - a chance to double their score. Team C won, with more points by far than B or A put together. Much badinagerie was passed back and forth among the teams but all in good fun. The Hail Mary went to Team A, but no team got the answer, largely due to fraud on the part of the question-compilers. Charges have been lodged with the local constabulary and trial has been set for the Bow Street Magistrates Court :). A second Hail Mary was granted to Team A, to which 100% credit was given for the correct answer, which solidly affirmed Team A's third place win. A raucous celebration was held.

Respectfully submitted
David Stepsay, Secretary

JULY 2007

The next meeting of the club will held on Sunday, July 8, 2007 at the usual time of 1:00 P.M. The venue will be the Balboa Mission Town Hall, Granada Hills. Everyone should have already received a "heads up" from Roger Burry as to the content of his next presentation on Life and Coins of Mark Antony. We all look forward to it. Bring your coins.

At the last meeting the following took place:

BUSINESS

Michael Connor, Webmaster, reported that the Website was getting 200 visitors per day. Hugh Kramer's article on Nero is #1 and Kelly Ramage's Roman Wall Painting #2 of the member articles. Bob Effler reported on OCACC: they have available a course on 30 tapes dealing with Roman history of which we should pick 1 or 2 for a club meeting in the future. Bob read a letter from Golden Gate Coin Show (which takes place in Masonic Temple in Arcadia) re: sponsoring an exhibit. A discussion took place as to whether we would benefit by contributing the requested $50. It was moved, seconded, and passed that we sign on for one year only. (Barry has since reported that we got a Thank You for sponsoring the Ancient and Medieval category from Virginia Bourke).

Merrill Gibson has found 2 or 3 repaired coins in past auctions, triggering a discussion about repaired coins. Roger presented the results of his meeting survey in the form of slides projected on the screen, which slides he will print out for our records.

PRESENTATION

Randy Butler gave his second presentation on his travels in Turkey illustrated with ancient coins related to the places he visited. His travels have been extensive. He gave a brief narrative of what went on in the peninsula known as Gallipoli during WWI. Under command of Kemal Ataturk the Turks slaughtered the Allied forces trying to gain a foothold on that strategic piece of land. This made Ataturk a hero to the Turks. But the story starts with the Battle of Granicus won by Alexander the Great. Randy retraced the route of Alexander, together with a battle plan showing the Granicus River. Alexander won handily. Randy showed slides of Troy, at present-day Hissarlik; the acropolis of Assos, opposite Lesbos, where Aristotle lived for 3 years; and Pergamom important because of its impregnable position. Peramon was a center of arts and can claim a list of firsts, most notably for the development and use of parchment, a word derived from its name. Pergamon was illustrated with a coin of Seleukos I, to whom Pergamom devolved after Alex's death; Trajan's temple; the amphitheatre; the pedestal of the Altar of Zeus (the actual altar being in Berlin); the Temple of Demeter; and, the sacred road of the Aisclepion, the health resort of the ancient world-where Caracalla was a patient.

Respectfully submitted
David Stepsay, Secretary

AUGUST 2007

The next meeting of the club will take place on Sunday August 12, 2007 at the usual time of 1:00 P.M. at the Balboa Mission Town Hall, Granada Hills. Hugh Kramer will give a presentation entitled Constantine the Great and the Marriage of Church and State.

At the last meeting the following took place:

BUSINESS

Webmaster Michael Connor reported that visitation was up 80% over June 2006. Hugh Kramer's article on Nero was the most popular of the articles. Mike reminded us to buy books through the links on the Website so the Club gets Commission. OCACC liaison Ken Baumheckel reported that they have a video tape set on Roman history. Ken will bring the set to the next meeting. Roger Burry reporting on future programs: [from a memo he sent out on 7/20] August - Constantine the Great and the Marriage of Church and State, Hugh Kramer; September - Visit to Loyola Marymount Museum, Fr. William Fulco; October - Tiberius, his Life and Coins, Paul Ranc; November - Roman Imperial Coins, Barry Rightman; December - Travel in and Coins of Turkey, Randy Butler; January, 2008 - Pot Luck Banquet, Coin Quiz.

PRESENTATION

Roger Burry lead a symposium on Life and Coins of Marcus Antonius. The Antonius family traced its heritage back to Heracles. His step-father was executed for his part in the Cataline Conspiracy. Marcus had a wild youth; he was in debt for the sum of 250 talents, a whopping sum even now. Caesar took Marcus under his wing and made him second in command. Marcus came up under the cursus honorum (Quaestor, Augur, Tribune, Master of Horse, and several consulates). His speech from Shakespeare's play was shown on the screen and a discussion was held briefly as to how Antony turned the public against the conspirators in Caesar's death. Roger showed a chart in chronological order of the coins by source (military mint, other, and moneyers). Coins shown were after the assassination: M. Antonius 42 BC, Antonius and Octavia 39BC, Fleet coinage, and Antonius and Cleopatra.

Kudos to Roger Burry for his presentation. It would be hard to top the standard set by his and other recent presentations. Let's keep up the good work!

Respectfully submitted
David Stepsay, Secretary

SEPTEMBER 2007

The next meeting of the club will take place on September 9, 2007 at 1:00 P.M. The venue will be at the Loyola Marymount University Museum. Contact Roger Burry for specific directions. As indicated in the last notice, the program will be a presentation under the direction of Fr. William Fulco, the Curator.

BUSINESS

Treasurer Barry Rightman, having returned from his trip to Eastern Europe and Turkey, gave his treasury report. Webmaster Michael Connor reported that we have gotten 175 new visitors per day, almost as many so far as all of last year. A lot were interested in the images (through Google) and Kelly's article on Roman Wall Painting is #1 in popularity again. Ken Baumheckel OCACC liaison passed out the Teaching Co. catalog of half hour lectures 4 on a tape. It was moved, seconded, and passed that we provide a book to Fr. William Fulco as atken of our appreciation. Bob Effler reported that a coin he was asked to restore for a dealer sold quickly for $1,400 and that he received a good bronze coin as a thank you gift.

PRESENTATION

Hugh Kramer's very interesting talk entitled "The 13th Apostle" was on Constantine the Great and the Marriage of Church and State. His approach to the subject was from the Roman perspective. They were generally tolerant of other religions and had plural gods. The head of state was the personification of the religion. There was no proselytizing by one state religion to another. Blame was never on the gods but on lack of faith. In the 14th century BCE Aknaton posited a single god, but by Roman times the gods still were nationalistic. There was not much restriction on religious practices. Once a year obeisance was required to the state religion. Hugh showed a coin of Vespasian who was an opportunist with regard to religion. A coin of Nero was shown, which was a picture of Nero's persecution of the Christians. The term odium generis humani was invoked (hatred of mankind) against Christians, a term applied to atheists. The persecutions were rather mild and sporadic. Constantine moved to make Christianity the state religion after his victory in the civil war at Milvian bridge (in hoc signo vinces). The war over, revolution was begun and looting and depletion of the temples ensued. Coin of Julian shown, who decided to bring back the Roman gods, but by then the temples were too savaged to be revived. Coin of Helena, Constantine's mother shown. She found relics of Christ, and Constantine built a church (of the Holy Sepulchre) on the spot. Churches then proliferated. At the Council of Niceae Constantine ordered persecutions of the unwilling. Literal orthodoxy was made a requirement of citizenship. Then Christians began to suffer persecutions at the hand of Christians. The Greeks were converted, but began questioning. Result, spiritual intolerance (book burning). The term "heresy" was brought into use. Then much strife and coercive force of the state. No one questioned the marriage of church and state. Civil authorities presided at the trials. All religions were aided by the state. It was spiritual vs temporal authority. Hugh analogized that situation to the present situation in Iraq: an attempt to impose democracy leading to the law of unintended consequences, with voting along sectarian lines (no Iraqi party and fragmentation along religious lines). After his talk some questions were addressed to Hugh. He is to be commended for tackling such a touchy subject within our precincts.

Respectfully submitted
David Stepsay, Secretary

OCTOBER 2007

The next meeting of the club will take place on Sunday October 14, 2007 at the usual time of 1:00 P.M. The meeting will be at the Balboa Mission Town Hall, Granada Hills. Paul Ranc will be the presenter and he will lead a Seminar/Discussion entitled Coin Buying Mistakes...I Have Made. The program will be a group discussion and if you would, remember any mistake(s) you have made, bring the coin if you still have it, and be prepared to talk about the mistake(s) and any lessons you may have learned. Also since this meeting is just after the Long Beach Coin Show and CNG Auction, bring any coins that you might have purchased for an extended Show and Tell session.

BUSINESS

The last meeting was held at the Archaeology Center at Loyola Marymount University. Meeting was called to order by Bob Effler at 1:30. Barry Rightman, Treasurer, reported on the status of the treasury. It is in good shape. Webmaster Michael Connor reported that things are going great guns. The #1 page is the one on Nero and the #2 page is the one on Caesar. Ken Baumheckel reported that the OCACC meeting was graced with the showing of the Byzantine DVD. Roger Burry reported on upcoming presentations. A card from a distributor of loupes was received. It shows four types of loupe available at a discount. We will make an by the next meeting.

PRESENTATION

We listened attentively to Fr. Fulco's narrative of how the Archaeology Center came into existence. In 1997, Loyola Marymount University purchased the main building from the Howard Hughes successors. A chair in Ancient Near Eastern Studies has been endowed. The building houses the library that we were meeting in and the museum and classrooms. Majors from other departments come to some of the classes to study Classics. Fr. Fulco named some of the past curators, one of whom was a guest speaker at an ACCLA meeting few years ago. There are 2,500 registered coins and they work closely with the Getty Museum. They have been working on the long term impact of different coin holders. The two rooms to which we were directed in this meeting are climate controlled. But different temperatures are needed for books and antiquities. Interestingly all items are for hands-on teaching purposes, with drawers of pottery shards inter alia to be handled, and Loyola Marymount University is one of the few universities with undergraduate numismatic classes. They also teach the history of writing. They do photography for archiving tasks. The session broke up to tour the collections and a select few secreted themselves at a section of the room to view the coins at closer range. The shelves of books are labeled according to topic, provenance, coinage, and language. Fr. Fulco brought out various lovely coin specimens from the vault for our edification. At the end of the session he was presented with a certificate of appreciation and a copy of Frank Holt's Thundering Zeus. We all appreciated the opportunity to be invited to the Center for our meeting.

NEW MEMBERS

David Tulanian joined us at the meeting; he is just starting his quest in the ancient coin field. Joe Tooma has also joined and his interest is in eastern Sassanian and Armenian; he is from the Rochester Numismatic Association, the oldest numismatic club in the U.S. We extend a hearty welcome to our new members!

Respectfully submitted
David Stepsay, Secretary

NOVEMBER 2007

The next meeting will take place on Sunday November 11, 2007 at 1:00 P.M. at the Balboa Mission Town Hall, Granada Hills. Barry Rightman will expound on Favorite Coins from My Imperial Collection.

BUSINESS

Webmaster Michael Connor reported that two more of the Caesars have been received (Caligula and Julius Caesar). We are only missing Claudius. Visits are up (school's beginning). Roger Burry reported that nominations will be held next month and elections in December with installation, as usual, being in January. Merrill Gibson brought in 2 history DVD's. Various members discussed the Long Beach Coin show.

PRESENTATION

Paul Ranc gave a brief review of the life of Tiberius. He described Capri and Tiberius' depredations. Paul pointed out that Tacitus hated Tiberius. Paul then moved into a discussion of Mistakes I have made. These included: a Iulia Mammaea bronze that was soaked in olive oil which took off patina and revealed roughness being hidden thereby. Overpayment for a Carausias in Rome that would have been much cheaper in Britain. Paul bought because he needed it, which you shouldn't do. Other members chimed in with their own examples of mistakes both bad and good.

Respectfully submitted
David Stepsay, Secretary

DECEMBER 2007

The next meeting will take place on Sunday December 9, 2007 at the usual time of 1:00 P.M. at the Balboa Mission Town Hall, Granada Hills. Next month's presenter will be Randy Butler who will talk on Travels In and Coins of Turkey. The December meeting will include the election of officers.

BUSINESS

A motion to buy 2 boxes of loupes for sale to Club members was moved, seconded, and passed. Webmaster Michael Connor reported 240 new visitors per day, and total visitation for 2007 was already 20% higher than 2006 and there are still 2 months to go. Kelly Ramage's Roman Paintings article is once again #1--then Nero, Julius Caesar, and Claudius. The Levines reported on the new museum, Muzeo, in Anaheim, with currently an ancient Roman exhibit. Roger reported that in January, the officers will be installed at our installation-cum-banquet, and in February Dr. Cleve will present the great paintings from Maestum.

PRESENTATION

The presentation was made by Barry Rightman on Favorite Coins from His Imperial Collection. Barry started by saying that the factors by which he selected these coins were inter alia die, rarity, and portrait, of which there were some 40 different persons. The coins discussed and shown were as follows:

Fulvia, wife of Marcus Antonius on a bronze
Octavian: Lugdunum (Silver denarius)
Augustus: As Colonia Vitrix (over Spain)
Augustus: Corinth mint (bought because of reverse)--portrait of the Duavir
Lucius Caesar: Minted in Lydia; he died in his teens
Britannicus: From the Bosporus; King Codys
Young Nero as Caesar: Silver didrachm, minted in Antioch circa 50-54
Messalina: Third wife of Nero. Minted (the coin) in Ephesus, as personification of Roma
Domitia: Minted in Ephesus, reverse showing Artemis
Trajan: Reverse Via Traiana (a road built to Beneventum). Ex Michael Price collection
Matidia: Niece of Trajan. Minted in Rome
Sabina: Wife of Hadrian. Reverse Ceres, Goddess of agriculture
Antoninus Pius: Reverse Temple of Divine Livia and Augustus, both standing in doorway
Didius Julianus: Very rare. Reverse shown holding globe
Iulia Domna: Consecratio; Ex Martin Melcher collection. Minted by Elagabalus. Reverse Serapis
Gordian II: Ex. British Museum
Gordian III as Caesar: Good portrait; priestly implements
Tranquilina: Minted in Pontus. Reverse Agonistic Table (Olympic Games)
Philip II: Reverse--detail on elephant, with mahoot on top and strapping
Heranius Etruscus: Reverse celebration of victory over Goths
Hostilian as Caesar:
Cornelia Superba: Wife of Aemilian
Probus: Silver.
Iulian of Pannonia: Good Antoninianus; about nickel size; Reverse victory
Diocletian: Reverse London mint; personification of Providence
Domitius Domitianus: minted in Alexandria
Severus II: Minted in Apulei. Facing left. Reverse Severus about to pierce a kneeling foe
Maximinus II: Reverse Sol Invicta
Maxentius (AE 3): Herculian family. Minted in Rome
Constantine I: Silvered large size Rex on horse
Licinius (AE 3): Reverse aerial view of castra. Figure at vortex is Sol. Courage of Army depicted. X indicating end of old religion
Constantine II: Antioch
Constantius II: First one with Byzantine style. Minted 351-355. Reverse Roma and Goddess of Constantinople
Maxentius: Roman mint. Reverse victory of Emperor and liberty for Romans
Valentinian: Minted in Constantinople
Valens:
Valentinian II:
Johannes (tremesis): Part of Hunt collection. 423-425. Minted in Ravenna
Anthenius.

NEW MEMBER

Mike Cozzolino, a past President and Secretary of the club in days of yore rejoined the club. Welcome back, Mike!

Respectfully submitted
David Stepsay, Secretary

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