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ANCIENT COIN CLUB OF
LOS ANGELES

MEETING NOTICES 2006

MONTHLY MEETINGS ARE NOW HELD AT THE SHERMAN OAKS GALLERIA.

JANUARY 2006

The next meeting of the club will be held on Sunday January 8, 2006 at the usual time of 1:00 P.M. at the Balboa Mission Town Hall, Granada Hills.

The meeting will be the annual Installation-Cum-Banquet. Please see mine of the last instant for the list of who is bringing what. Again, it is requested that if you are not on the list but planning to come, please let the undersigned know what you are planning to bring. Michael Connor will hold forth with a short presentation on how to make coins look good in Powerpoint.

At the last meeting the following took place:

BUSINESS

It was moved, seconded, and passed that the Treasurer pay the room rent for the next year. Michael Connor reported that there were 83 new visitors on the website per day in November. Mike needs the rest of the Emperors! Ken Baumheckel reported that OC Ancient Coin Club is having a white elephant sale next Sunday at which coins of no more that $10 in value will be for sale. We welcomed a new member, Joe Costa who collects mostly Roman. Barry reported that there were some good buys at the Malter Auction. CNG will be in L.A. on December 18 at the Beverly Hilton. Ken Friedman announced that the application for 501(c)3 status has been filed with IRS.

The Elections were held for the Board of Directors for 2006. By acclamation, the following officers were duly elected to serve:

President: Bob Effler
Vice President: Roger Burry
Secretary: David Stepsay
Treasurer: Barry Rightman

The following members were elected to the Board of Directors by acclamation:

Michael Connor
Ken Friedman
Merrill Gibson
Hugh Kramer (Past President)
Michelle Nevins
Paul Ranc

PRESENTATION

At the last meeting of the club Roger Burry presented his talk on Roman Britain, using the digital projector to very good advantage. The story began in 55 BCE when the Romans invaded as part of their plan for Manifest Destiny. Ostensibly the reason was to stop the outpouring of Gallic refugees. It was a "surgical strike", the Romans leaving as soon as the job had been done. It was about 100 years before they would be back. Meanwhile the Republic had been dissolved. Caratacus, son of Cunobelinus, was defeated by Vespasian and the Britons perforce retreated, to fight another day. The day arrived with the arrival of Emperor Claudius, who took charge, and the Britons were defeated again. This time Claudius and Vespasian took the troops up country, making use of such artillery as ballistae and scorpiones, the former of which projected stones and the latter, arrows. Vespasian vacated his victorious position and went back to Rome. Meanwhile the Romans left in Britain began what we would call nation-building. There was a Welsh uprising under Caratacus, and he was captured, sent to Rome, and pardoned to live a life of leisure. What did Claudius contribute as Emperor? Probably to enhance his reputation as a general?

The Iceni of East Anglia then rose up in arms and the daughter of their leader, Queen Boudicca (sometimes spelled as Boadicea), led them to a defeat at the hands of the Romans. The Brigantines then grew unruly, and Vespasian sent his son-in-law Cerialis to take charge. He sent troops to Wales and at Stanwyck the Welsh were defeated. The far south of the British Isles became pro-Roman and peace reigned. However, trouble with the Scots began when Agricola was appointed governor, and they fought at the line where Hadrian's wall later arose. Defeating the Caledonians, the Romans never went further north. Lots of forts were built in the north, and roads to service them built from north to south. Roger showed a slide of the complex of pools that were built at Bath. Also the bottom consisting of lead sheets, the overflow drain, the heated room, and the Roman arch. St. Albans was built by the Romans (then called Verulamium) with a large theatre along Watling Street, of which an artist's rendition was shown. It was a wealthy town and pictures of a town house were shown, as well as of Hadrian's wall. It stretched 73 miles from the Tyne to Solway and consisted of 17 forts and mile-forts. The wall, made of stone and rubble, stood 15' high and thick. It had been first made of wood and then stone. There was a ditch fore and aft of it. He showed a fort on the wall and a bath house near the Tyne with dressing rooms in the alcoves and a latrine and various other buildings. There was an ebb and flow of battles (Picts, Scots, and Caledonians) from 190 to 320 CE. Meanwhile life in the south was serene.

More slides of coins were shown and further history was detailed until 320 when Constantine II was overthrown by Constans and there was a gradual retreat by the Romans south till 420, when command was relinquished and the Romans abandoned Britain.

The talk was very worthwhile especially to those of us interested in early English history, and surprising to me to learn of the all-pervading influence of the Romans in Britain.

Respectfully submitted
David Stepsay, Secretary

FEBRUARY 2006

The next meeting of the Ancient Coin Club of Los Angeles will be held on Sunday February 12, 2006 at the usual time of 1:00 P.M at the Balboa Mission Town Hall, Granada Hills. Dr. Marty Kenigsberg will present Learning About Jewish History From Judean Coins.

LAST MEETING

The January meeting featured the Instrallation of Officers and the Annual Banquet. Officers and Board members for the year 2006 were installed as follows:

President: Bob Effler
Vice-President/Program Chairman: Roger Burry
Secretary: David Stepsay
Treasurer: Barry Rightman
Board Members:
Hugh Kramer, Immediate Past President
Michael Connor
Ken Friedman
Merrill Gibson
Michelle Nevins
Paul Ranc

The installation of officers was followed by the Annual Potluck Banquet.

After the dinner, Michael Connor gave a short presentation on Twelve Tips for Using Power Point and Coins each tip illustrated with images of coins distantly related in theme to the appropriate verse from the Twelve Days of Christmas. Attendees guessed the connections and attributed the coins.

Dinner, presentation and coin discussions were enjoyed by all.

Respectfully submitted
Roger Burry for David Stepsay, Secretary

MARCH 2006

The ACCLA will meet at 1:00 P.M. on 12 March, 2006 at the Town Hall in the Mission Shopping Center in Granada Hills. The program will be Globe Images On Ancient Coins and Antiquities by Dr. Raymond Sydrys.

FEBRUARY 2006 MEETING RECAP

ACCLA President Bob Effler opened the business part of the meeting by welcoming members and guests. Following the business meeting, members of the Ancient Coin Club of Los Angeles and their guests were treated to a very engaging history lesson as Dr. Martin Kenigsberg presented Jewish History Through Ancient Judean Coins. Beginning with a quote from I Maccabees "I give thee leave also to coin money…" he led into a discussion of coins of the Hashmonean dynasty of 135-37 BCE. The discussion was illustrated with slides of Judean coins. The symbols on the coins helped explain aspects of this period of Jewish history. An interesting example was a Mattathias Antigonus prutah with a "showbread" table and menorah on the reverse.

A coin of Herod the Great introduced the Herodian rulers who governed Judea from 40 BCE to 95 CE. An eagle above the entrance to the Jerusalem Temple on one of Herod's coins was the first graven image on a Jewish coin. In the third part of the talk, Dr. Kenigsberg discussed the Jewish War against the Romans in 66-70 CE. A bronze half shekel with a date palm and baskets for gathering dates was one of many interesting coins presented.

The coins illustrated by Dr. Kenigsberg were from his collection and provided insight into many aspects of ancient Jewish life. At the conclusion of the presentation a number of Judean coins and some small oil lamps were offered for inspection.

Respectfully submitted
Roger Burry for David Stepsay, Secretary

APRIL 2006

The Ancient Coin Club of Los Angeles will meet at 1:00 P.M. on Sunday 9 April, 2006 at the Town Hall in the Mission Shopping Center in Granada Hills. The program will be Travels in Turkey - Western Sites and their Coins, Part 2 by Randall Butler.

Respectfully submitted
Roger Burry for David Stepsay, Secretary

MAY 2006

The next meeting of the club will take place on Sunday May 14, 2006, at the usual time of 1:00 P.M. at the Balboa Mission Town Hall, Granada Hills. The presenter will be Ken Friedman who will expound on Another Boring Biga, or the Devil and Delight Are in the Details. It bids fair to be an interesting and instructive talk.

I am glad to be back at home from the Rehab Center where I was ensconced for about 3 1/2 months. Not having been in attendance for that period, I do not have any review of the last presentation to engage in. I want to thank Roger Burry and anyone else who took it upon themselves to step into my place for the note-taking and meeting notice sending. I look forward to resuming those duties to the best of my ability. 

Respectfully submitted
David Stepsay, Secretary

JUNE 2006

The next meeting of the club will take place on Sunday June 11, 2006 at the usual time of 1:00 P. at the Balboa Mission Town Hall, Granada Hills. In honor of Father's Day, the meeting topic is Ancient Fathers: Show and Tell - fathers featured on ancient coins.

LAST MEETING

The following business was transacted. Michael Connor the Webmaster, reported that we now have articles on 6 of the XII Caesars. He asked for volunteers to complete the missing articles. By the end of next month we will have had more visitors to the site than all of last year. The promotional brochure he had prepared for the club was passed around for inspection. Next meeting will fall on Fathers' Day. Therefore everyone should bring a coin of a father and be prepared to give a brief disquisition on his offspring. The ACCLA anniversary presentations were discussed.

PRESENTATION

Ken Friedman gave a presentation called "Another Boring Biga". The presentation was well-received, because it was so well done and had wonderful. As is the case with all our presenters, many thanks are due to Ken.

Respectfully submitted
David Stepsay, Secretary

JULY 2006

The next meeting will take place Sunday July 9, 2006 at 1:00 P.M. at the Balboa Mission Town Hall, Granada Hills. Bob Effler will give a talk entitled Roman Coinage of Syria and First Century Client Kingdoms.

LAST MEETING

The president thanked the presenter of last month, Ken Friedman, for his very replete presentation. A new membership roster was handed out by the undersigned. Anent the club anniversary meeting, Roger said that the program will be centered around David Sear. A committee consisting of Barry, Mike, and Roger was appointed. Also it was pointed out that travel by Metro to the Long Beach Show is now possible, should the price of gas keep rising. There was an interesting discussion about the rising prices of coins in Europe.

PRESENTATION

Since it was Fathers' Day, it was decided to have a show-and-tell consisting of coins bearing the countenance of famous sons. Various emperors and kings with famous sons from Zeus to Henry VIII were treated of and the coins passed around for close inspection. In addition to this, Roger developed a quiz game requiring answers re the grading and sales price of 5 examples of the same coin, as applied to 3 or 4 coins.

Respectfully submitted
David Stepsay, Secretary

AUGUST 2006

The next meeting of the club will take place on Sunday August 13, 2006 at the usual time of 1:00 P.M.at the Balboa Mission Town Hall, Granada Hills. This will be gala occasion being the Forthieth Anniversary Meeting of the Ancient Club of Los Angeles. The presenter will be David R. Sear, who will be giving a talk entitled Experiences in My Career in Ancient Numismatics. It is a rare privilege to have so illustrious a speaker at our club, and, as previously noted, we should make every effort to see that the meeting is well attended.

LAST MEETING

The Webmaster, Michael Connor, reported that it is now the fourth anniversary of the web page. We have about 100 visitors per day and the favorite pages so far are the ones of Nero and Tiberius. Caligula is still needed to complete the collection of XII Caesars. In the future, Mike will bring to the meeting some of the questions being asked by the visitors to the site. Dean Ruby reported on the CNG mail auction: the sales prices exceeded the estimates by many percents; and the books even more so. In a discussion which followed, it was pointed out that artistic coins are going for big money. Also that a low estimate is good business to draw people into the bidding. There was much more discussion regarding auctions in general. Roger Burry reported on the Anniversary Committee. The day of the meeting at the Long Beach Convention will be September 16. Roger also reports that at some ACCLA meeting in the near future a Coin Attribution Game, Name That Coin, is planned. And he would like each member to look at their collection (or elsewhere) and select several coins that might pose an attribution challenge to the club members. The choices don't have to be too hard.

The presenter was Bob Effler, on Roman Coinage of Syria and First Century Client Kingdoms.

Respectfully submitted
David Stepsay, Secretary

SEPTEMBER 2006

The next meeting of the club will take place on September 10, 2006 starting at 1:00 P.M. at the Balboa Mission Town Hall, Granada Hills. The presenter will be Barry Rightman, who will expound on Roman Imperial Coins with Historical Reverses.

LAST MEETING

Being the Fortieth Anniversary, the meeting was exceptionally well attended. The following is some of the business that was transacted:

Michael Connor, Webmaster, reported that there are now 100 visitors to the Website per day. Kelly Ramage's article on Roman Paintings is still the most popular single page with Hugh Kramer's article on Vitellius a close second. Ken Baumheckel the Orange County Club liaison reported that Ken Martin is speaking on coin grading. Ken Friedman, reporting on incorporation, said the permanent tax exemption is expected in the near future, and will be retroactive to November, 2005.

As part of the 40th Anniversary festivities, a brief history regarding the founding of the club was undertaken by Barry Rightman. The Levines who were among the founding members were present at this meeting. When the club was founded in 1966, other founders included the Donalds, the Madsens, the Rauches, Alvin Kleeb, Earl Kieffer, and Joel Malter. Many of the founding members have since passed. Meetings started at Westdale Savings. After several more moves we arrive at the present place. The club recently filed to incorporate as a formal not-for-profit organization.

SPECIAL PRESENTATION

Introduced by Roger Burry, DAVID R. SEAR was the much-appreciated guest speaker. His talk was on his career from youth to present as a numismatist. David was born in London and went into ancient coins early in life. One of his books is now in the Fourth edition. He has been a professional numismatist for 48 years. In public school he had a teacher who arranged a trip to Verulamium (here began the slides). He showed a mosaic street in St. Albans and this trip was a turning-point in forming his career path. David showed his 53-year-old illustration for a class, of which he was justly proud. A picture of Dover Castle, the oldest building in England, was shown. Two slides showed the Fortress of Richborough; Dorchester Castle at the edge of the Saxon shore. Also a Roman milestone embedded in Hadrian's wall, the ruin of Corbridge, and a latrine ruin also on Hadrian's wall.

He subscribed to the publication of the H. A. Seaby firm, of which he subsequently became an employee. He showed a window in the building of the rooms occupied by various employees, many of whom became eminent, such as Colonel Kozolubski. A slide of the going-away card signed by the various employees, whose pictures he pointed out, was shown. David became head of the Ancient Department, succeeding Colonel Kozolubski. He named more authorities whom he worked with. The staff expanded from 15 to 45 or so during his tenure. He re-wrote Seaby's Roman Coins and their Values without Mr. Seaby's knowledge or permission. It was published and in print until 2000. Then he started his career as an author. He quit Seaby's in 1973 and completed Byzantine Coins and their Values. The 1987 Revised edition is still in print. Seaby offered David his job back, where he met all the great authorities. Eventually Seaby's went out of business, and David moved to Los Angeles where he worked for NFA. In 1984 he co-founded Freeman and Sear, which is still going strong.

David thanked Barry for his invaluable help in his publishing efforts, answered questions from the audience, and signed books. Photographs of the festivities are available on the Fortieth Anniversary page.

Respectfully submitted
David Stepsay, Secretary

OCTOBER 2006

The next meeting of the club will be held on Sunday October 8, 2006 at 1:00 P.M. at the Balboa Mission Town Hall, Granada Hills. The next meeting will be a Name That Coin! session. It is a coin attribution game, moderated by Ken Baumheckel. Members are requested to select 3-4 coins that might puzzle our members. They can be Greek, Roman, Egyptian, Judean...even Parthian! Please send a digital image or photo of the coins to Michael Connor. This will let us project them so that everyone can participate. Also send the attribution: denomination, obverse, reverse, country, year of issue. Please bring the coins with you to the meeting.

LAST MEETING

Barry Rightman gave a presentation entitled Roman Imperial Coins with Historical Reverses. Not having attended, the following is a list of the coins he discussed compiled from notes which Barry kindly supplied me with.

  1. Pompey the Great: issued by Sextus Pompey, son, commemorating his victory over the Caesarian forces off the coast of Rhegium in 42 BCE. Legend on reverse: the Senate bestowing the title of Commander-in-Chief of fleet and of Sea Coasts on Sextus in 43 BCE.
  2. Octavian: thunderbolt symbolizing the victory in the Perusian War by Octavian in 40 BCE.
  3. Caligula: in celebration of the dedication of the new Temple of Augustus in the Forum in 37 CE.
  4. Nero: Goddess Roma is portrayed in celebration of the rebuilding of Rome after the great fire of 64 CE.
  5. Vespasian: Titus and Domitian recognized as heirs apparent circa 70-71 CE.
  6. Trajan: issued by Trajan in 98 CE in memory of Nerva's death and consecration.
  7. Trajan: in celebration of completion of the road from Beneventum near Naples to Brundisium in 109 CE.
  8. Hadrian: raising up the personification of Hispania in commemoration of his visit to Spain in 122 CE.
  9. Antoninus Pius: depiction of Temple of Augustus, restored over 100 years after completion in 37 CE.
  10. Faustina the Elder: wife of Antoninus Pius, commemorates dedication of temple in 141 CE, still standing in the Forum.
  11. Faustina the Younger: wife of Emperor Marcus Aurelius, having given birth to 6 children, the coin celebrates their expanding family, specifically their 4 daughters.
  12. Didius Julianus: celebrating his accession to the throne after outbidding the Prefect of Rome to become Emperor.
  13. Septimius Severus: in acknowledgment of the support of all 16 of the legions in his ascendancy in 193 CE.
  14. Julia Domna: wife of Septimius Severus, issued posthumously by Elagabulus in 218 CE, in support of his relationship to the Severan family.
  15. Plautilla, wife of Caracalla: in celebration of marriage to Caracalla in hopes of having children to continue the Severan line. Issued in 202 CE.
  16. Elagabalus: to celebrate the accession of this Emperor in 218 CE.
  17. Gordian III: raised to the rank of Caesar by popular demonstration in 238 CE.
  18. Philip I: celebrating the 1000th anniversary of the founding of Rome issued in 248 CE.
  19. Trajan Decius: pays homage to Illyrian troops who helped him become Emperor. Issued in 249 CE.
  20. Herennius Etruscus: to celebrate victory over Goths in 251 CE.
  21. Volusian: Issued to protect the people against the plague ravaging the Empire in 252 CE.
  22. Gallienus: celebrates victory over Alemanni at Milan in 259 CE.
  23. Aurelian: celebrates reunification of Empire in 273 CE for first time in 13 years.
  24. Probus: celebrates severe drubbing he administered to German tribes in 278 CE.
  25. Diocletian: celebrates defeat of Sarmatians in 293 CE.
  26. Diocletian: Announces abdication of this Emperor in 305 CE and beginning of his retirement in Split on the Dalmatian coast. Only Emperor to retire willingly and remain so.
  27. Maximianus I: announcing his coming out of retirement to become Protector of Rome in 307 CE.
  28. Constantius I: Minted in Carthage, depicts personification of Africa and victory by Maximianus over Mauretanians in 297 CE.

Respectfully submitted
David Stepsay, Secretary

NOVEMBER 2006

The next meeting of the club will be held on Sunday November 12, 2006 at 1:00 P.M. at the Balboa Mission Town Hall, Granada Hills. In last year's program survey, members expressed interest in Greek coinage. Roger Burry has arranged a very interesting program for the November meeting to do just that. Since all of us have some knowledge of Greek coins, we'll have a seminar to make use of this resident expertise. For those of us who would like more background, some books and websites are:

  • Numismatic Art of the Greek World--Wayne Sayles; Krause Pub.
  • Greek Coins-- Ian Carradice, British Museum Press
  • Collecting Greek Coins--David Sear; S. Gibbons Pub.
  • Collecting Greek Coins by John Anthony
  • Archaic and Classical Greek Coins by Colin M. Kraay
  • Greek Coins and their Values by David Sear
  • http://tjbuggey.ancients.info/index.html

LAST MEETING

Michael Connor, webmaster, reported that the website was receiving 100 visitors daily, twice as many as this time last year. Lots of clicks on the Emperor pages. Ken Baumheckel, OCACC liaison, reported that in two weeks there will be a lecture on Armenian issues by an author by name of Narcisian. Roger Burry, Celator representative, reported on a nice write-up of our last two meetings. He gave a brief rundown of contents for the benefit of our guests.

We played Name That Coin, an idea of Roger Burry's. The Moderator was Ken Baumheckel and the Impresario was Michael Connor. The group was divided into two teams on opposite sides of the room. All coins entered in the quiz were on the computer as lantern slides and numbered for easy reference. Points were awarded by the Moderator according to merit of the answer and for effort put forth. The undersigned had the job of keeping track of the proceedings and recording the results. In the interest of conserving space the results are not being published herein, but anyone wishing a copy may have one for the asking.

Respectfully submitted
David Stepsay, Secretary

DECEMBER 2006

The next meeting of the club will be held on Sunday December 10, 2006 at 1:00 P.M. at Balboa Mission Town Hall, Granada Hills. In our next meeting we will be privileged to have as guest speaker Mr. Liladhar R. Pendse who will hold forth on Images of Power and Glory on the Coinage of Trajan.

LAST MEETING

Ken Friedman reported that we have received the 501(c)3 recognition letter from the IRS. Webmaster Michael Connor eported that the upsurge in visitors continues unabated with 150 new visitors per day (twice as many as this time last year).  Roger Burry said that this issue of the Celator contains a good article with a picture of David Sear taken by Michael Connor.

Coins of the Ancient Greek World were the subject matter of a presentation and round robin moderated by Roger Burry.

Topics included the requirements of colonization; the earliest materials and designs of coinage; the technological requirements of coinage such as precious metal source; a knowledge of metallurgy; and die-carving techniques. The metals used were electrum, gold, silver, and bronze. These were acquired by mining, trading, and capture. The Greeks had the technique of smelting (separating the metal from the dross). In the south, they had only silver whereas in the north they had gold. Interestingly, there is evidence that the Greek aristocracy disdained coinage as only for the lower classes. (That is possibly why the word coin itself comes from the work for "common" in Greek?). Dennis Morley gave a review of the reign and death of Lysimachus illustrated with a tray of portrait coins. Merrill Gibson discussed Ptolemaic coins. Dean Ruby showed an arrangement of Corinthian coins by chronology of their issue and gave a review of Greek counterfeits. Ken Friedman reviewed various coins from Africa. Randy Butler commented on the beauty of Greek silver and showed a very handsome Bactrian coin, a tetradrachm of Eucratides. Barry Rightman circulated a rare coin from Izmir with Cybele (a Phrygian goddess) on the obverse, of which we were supposed to have noticed that it was a fake.

NEW MEMBERS

Our latest member, who signed up last meeting, is Bob Lattanzi. He is a geologist/paleontologist. Welcome, Bob!

Respectfully submitted
David Stepsay, Secretary

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